digital-reading

Making Digital Reading Easier

Literacy is the ability to read and write. Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks. [www.transliteracy.com]

As a librarian in a 1:1 school, my students are consuming most of their information in a digital format (eBooks, websites, databases, video clips, etc.). In addition to consuming information, students are doing a great deal of producing via digital tools. While there are tremendous benefits to using digital tools, they can also pose some challenges. Finding. Reading. Organizing. Saving. Sharing. All of these can be difficult for some. Not only can it be difficult, but some students and teachers just prefer reading print.

At my school, my students and teachers have access to eBooks via MackinVIA. Fortunately, MackinVIA has a bunch of built in features allowing my students to adjust size, color, contrast, and even highlight text. And since MackinVIA works on virtually all devices, my students can customize their reading experience no matter what they are reading.

Unfortunately, these customization options aren’t as easy to access or as obvious when reading text on the open web or through a database. Here are some of my favorite tips and tools to make reading online text a bit easier.

1. Change text size

Seems obvious right? The easiest way to change text size is using your keyboard shortcuts. If you’re on a Mac, use Command +. PC users use Ctrl +. Unfortunately, the keyboard shortcuts will zoom your entire screen, which can sometimes distort what you’re trying to read. If that is the case, you can always change the default text size through your browser settings.

I am a lover of Chrome (there’s no place like Chrome), and it is very simple to change the text size. I had to get into the Advance Settings to see the text size options. As you can see, I have multiple options and I can also change the font (note: depending on how the website is formatted, not all fonts will be impacted by this change)

2. Readability

Readability is my go-to for making reading easier. It removes all the clutter and makes online reading much more like print.

Readability is available as an app on both iOS and Android and is also available as an extension for Chrome.

BEFORE READABILITY

AFTER READABILITY

I love that you can send to Kindle or print this version.

3. Clearly by Evernote

If you’re a user of Evernote (or even if you aren’t) another option is Clearly. While Clearly has some more customization options than Readability, it isn’t available as an app. Clearly is an extension for Firefox, Chrome, and Opera.

BEFORE CLEARLY

AFTER CLEARLY

ADVANCED OPTIONS

4. BeeLine Reader

I am so excited about this one! BeeLine Reader is different than anything I’ve used before. Instead of changing font or size, it changes the gradient (crazy, right?). I’m totally digging it! It took me a few paragraphs to figure out which gradient I liked best (I like dark), but it made a huge difference.

Want to see if BeeLine Reader can help you? Click here to take the challenge.

BeeLine is a web extension but you can also copy and paste text to be changed. You can also upload PDFs.

BeeLine Reader is free with unlimited use for 30 days and 5 times per day after that. The Premium plan is still very reasonable at only $10 year.

There are many other tools out there that can help make your digital reading experience more enjoyable. Although a lover of technology, I prefer reading text in print. However, most of my reading is done digitally simply because it isn’t available in print. I’m sure many of you are in the same boat. But you don’t need to suffer. Since using these tools, I have found reading text online to be much easier. Do you have any go-to tools that you or your students use? Share your favorites in the comments!

[For more information on the advantages of digital resources, check out this EdWeb.net webinar]

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  1. […] Making Digital Reading Easier – MackinVIA Connext. Literacy is the ability to read and write. Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks. [www.transliteracy.com] As a librarian in a 1:1 school, my students are consuming most of their information in a digital format (eBooks, websites, databases, video clips, etc.). In addition to consuming information, students are doing a great deal of producing via digital tools. At my school, my students and teachers have access to eBooks via MackinVIA. Unfortunately, these customization options aren’t as easy to access or as obvious when reading text on the open web or through a database. 1. […]

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